top of page

Freedom 515 - Colorado

Public·132 members
Hudson Martin
Hudson Martin

Metro: Last Light __LINK__


As a first-person shooter, Metro: Last Light features a variety of firearms, some fictional and some based on real weapons, which the player uses in combat. The game's protagonist, Artyom, also has the ability to kill an enemy directly with his melee weapon.[2] Artyom has three weapons slots. Players can put any weapon into these slots without restriction.[3] Players have access to four different secondary weapons, including throwing knives, incendiary grenades, and hand grenades.[6] Mutants do not possess weapons and tend to physically attack the player in swarms, while humans fight with the same firearms available to the player. The player can knock out or kill most human enemies instead of shooting them, using stealth to avoid detection. As enemies are inefficient in spotting the player character in darkness, players can turn off oil lamps and light bulbs to gain an advantage over their opponents.[7]




Metro: Last Light



The karma the player has acquired determines the ending. In the "bad" ending, Artyom destroys D6 to prevent Korbut from using the facility to wipe out the remnants of the other factions and possibly humanity, resulting in the deaths of himself, the surviving Rangers, and the Red Line forces. Later, Anna is shown telling their son of Artyom's bravery. In the "good" ending, later revealed as the canonical ending, Artyom prepares to destroy the bunker but is stopped by the little Dark One, who, along with the awakened Dark Ones, defeats Korbut's army. Artyom calls the little Dark One humanity's "last light of hope". In both endings, the young Dark One leaves with the surviving Dark Ones to find safety, while promising that they will come back in the future to help rebuild the world.


Last Light is powered by 4A Games' own in-house engine, 4A Engine.[32] The team also worked to improve the game's lighting and destruction system and introduced a larger variety of color palette.[33] The game was originally set to be released for Nintendo's Wii U, and the title was included in the Wii U show-reel, though THQ has since stated that the game may not be released for that platform.[34] Regarding the possibility of the game coming to the Wii U, 4A Games chief technical officer Oles Shishkovtsov said the Wii U has a "horrible, slow CPU".[35] Beynon, reiterated the sentiment, saying that there would not be a Wii U version of the game, because the studio "couldn't justify the effort required" and they "just figured it wasn't worth pursuing at this time".[35] 4A experimented with the Wii U development kit, but later gave up this version of the game during its early stages of development.[36]


Additionally, four DLC packs were released. The first pack, the Faction Pack, was to be available in June 2013,[59] however the release date was pushed back to July 2013. This pack contains three bonus single-player missions, with the player playing as a Red Line Sniper, a Fourth Reich 'Heavy' soldier, and a Polis Ranger in training, with new weapons not found in the main storyline.[60] The other three packs were released within 60 days of releasing the Faction Pack. The second pack, the Tower Pack, gives single-player challenge missions that have online leaderboards. The third pack, the Developer Pack, features a shooting gallery, a combat simulator, an in-game museum, and a single-player mission titled "The Spiders' Nest". Finally, the fourth pack, the Chronicles Pack, features three additional single-player missions that contain three characters from the main storyline, Khan, Pavel, and Anna, adding in extra background story information about the world.[61][62] Players can buy a season pass, which gives them all four DLCs at a discounted price. It also contains a limited edition, in-game automatic shotgun called the Abzats,[63] and a light machine gun that was previously only available via pre-order from select retailers, the RPK.[64]


There are two endings to the game following this. In the bad ending, Artyom will activate D6's self-destruct device to prevent Korbut from using the facility to wipe out the remnants of humanity, resulting in the deaths of both the Ranger and Red Army. Artyom is survived by Anna, who is shown an unspecified time later telling her and Artyom's child of his father's adventures. In the good ending, Artyom prepares to activate the device, but is stopped by the Dark One child, who arrives along with several other surviving Dark Ones who had been hibernating inside a secret chamber in D6; the Dark Ones defeat Korbut's army, making it unnecessary for Artyom to sacrifice himself and D6. Artyom credits the Dark One child with being humanity's "last light" of hope for his efforts. In both endings, after the events of the game, the Dark One child leaves with the surviving Dark Ones, promising either Anna or Artyom that they would come back to help the world rebuild.


Metro: Last Light received positive reviews, generally higher than Metro 2033, with most complimenting the game's graphics and story, however, criticizing the game's induction of linear sequences and character animations. Game Informer's Jeff Marchiafava gave the game a rating of 8.75/10, stating that human AI has been greatly improved. IGN's Colin Moriarty stated as a verdict that "Metro: Last Light is a bold post-apocalyptic first-person shooter adventure uniquely told from the Russian point of view". Last Light's setting and presentation are its strong points, though the last third of its campaign is weaker than everything that came before it stated Colin. He scored it 7.2/10 for consoles and 7.7/10 for the PC. Of the highest reviews, GameSpot's Kevin VanOrd awarded it with a 9.0/10 calling it "an astonishing and moving post-apocalyptic journey", with GameTrailers' Nathan Meunier awarding "one of the best looking and unique shooters of [the] year ... with an incredible atmosphere that really [sticks]", the highest score of 9.1/10. Metro Last Light topped very few 'best of 2013' lists outside those of more dedicated fans. Despite this, it received many nominations for Best Shooter of 2013 and was notably awarded as the 4th best FPS of 2013 by Gameranx, 2nd place on Wikia's own Community Choice Awards, and the runner up to the Escapist Magazine's best shooter of 2013.


One of Metro 2033's weaknesses was its monster design, being neither especially threatening in appearance nor entertaining to fight. Both aspects have been vastly improved here. The bounding packs of mansized mole-mutants have been given an animation overhaul that gives them a scuttling, vicious guile. And no longer do they just plough into you in a suicidal stream, instead opting to lash at you from multiple sides, or hanging back before closing the distance in a single ferocious leap. Spidery horrors burn in the light, creating a crowd control problem as you try and concentrate your beam on one of them long enough to inflict damage, while keeping the others at bay.


They still don't have the AI behaviour that makes the game's human opponents a joy to manipulate, but Metro's monsters serve to panic you rather than tax you tactically. Though to a blessedly lesser degree than in Metro 2033, your vision is constantly under assault, and this is most true when scrapping in a melee. Visors crack or bead with condensation or blood. Putting your shotgun to a beast at close range will spatter you with jam, which you'll have to smear away with the tap of another button. It's one of the many small make-work tasks that keeps combat a frantic act of multitasking. If you're underground, the chances are you'll periodically need to crank a handheld charger kit to stop your flashlight sputtering out, or to keep your night vision goggles powered. If you're overground you'll need to keep an eye on the clock, changing your gas mask's filters every five minutes, or replacing it entirely if damaged.


Artyom, an elite Ranger, is sent on a mission to find and kill the last of the "dark ones" -- telepathic humanoid mutants believed by many to be the greatest threat to humanity's continued existence. However, some people think these creatures are actually sentient and benign, and that the pain they cause people with whom they come in contact is due to incompatible neural wiring. Would killing the last of them be morally justified to save humanity, or murder? Artyom has a choice to make.


The story here picks up exactly one year after the events of Metro 2033. Artyom is still struggling with the decisions he made in the first game and is given an opportunity to put things right when a single surviving Dark One is found by the mystic Khan. Khan believes this creature could be the key to survival for mankind while the Rangers, now fortified deep in the D6 complex you discovered in Metro 2033, are adamant that it must be destroyed at all costs. You're sent out to find and kill the last remaining Dark One but, of course, things get complicated pretty quickly.


As we mentioned, Metro: Last Light goes big on action set pieces in comparison to the first game in the series, with mixed degrees of success. The combat system here is never really at its best when you're forced into ferocious gunfights; the whole thing works much better when it allows you the freedom to explore areas at your own pace, stealthily taking out your enemies and using your various gadgets and silenced guns to attract as little attention to yourself as possible. Fortunately, when this sequel does settle down into the series' signature stealth action, it absolutely trumps Metro 2033 with some delightfully large environments to fool around in, as well as one truly excellent section that calls to mind Half Life 2's free-wheeling vehicular levels as you get your hands on a busted-up car on rails and can choose to barrel along to the next settlement on the subway line or stop at a bunch of locations en-route to engage in some lone survival horror action.


Enemies have also had a nice overhaul here; humans remain the standout foe and you'll still find yourself facing off against the big shaggy mutants from the first game, but they definitely display some better AI this time around, waiting for their moment to attack rather than just appearing en masse and making a beeline straight into the business end of your gun. A new light-sensitive enemy is also introduced which can be forced off ledges using your torch or even flipped onto its back, revealing a soft underside for you to pump a couple of shotgun rounds into. Delightful stuff. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page