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Latest US Market Share Figures Released



NAR Media Communications issues a news release close to mid-month with the latest existing-home sales figures. The releases include analysis and quotes by NAR's Chief Economist Lawrence Yun regarding the sales volume, prices, inventory and interest rates.




Latest US market share figures released


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The 2020 market share data include countrywide direct written premiums for the top 25 groups and companies as reported on the state page of the annual financial statement for insurers that report to the NAIC.


The Life/Fraternal Market Share report contains cumulative market share data for life insurance, annuity considerations, and an aggregate total of life insurance, annuity considerations, deposit-type contract funds, other considerations and accident/health insurance.


The Property/Casualty Market Share report contains cumulative market share data for the following lines of business: personal auto, commercial auto, workers' compensation, medical professional liability, homeowners and other liability (excluding auto liability) insurance.


Today, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) released data on life/fraternal and property/casualty insurers. The reports provide market share information and identify leading insurance writers in several key lines of business. The reports reflect data filed by insurers as of March 1 and will be refreshed daily through March 4 and then each Monday throughout March.


The 2021 market share data include countrywide direct written premiums for the top 25 groups and companies as reported on the state page of the annual financial statement for insurers that report to the NAIC.


The Life/Fraternal Market Share report contains cumulative market share data for life insurance, annuity considerations, and an aggregate total of life insurance, annuity considerations, deposit-type contract funds, other considerations, and accident/health insurance.


The Property/Casualty Market Share report contains cumulative market share data for the following lines of business: personal auto, commercial auto, workers' compensation, medical professional liability, homeowners, and other liability (excluding auto liability) insurance.


This report represents a limited aspect of international travel - nonstop flows into and out of the U.S. Cities that serve as an international gateway will have high numbers in this report, but users should bear in mind that some portion of this traffic continued on a connecting flight to their final destination. Conversely, U.S. carriers serve some international points only through an international connection; therefore it might look as if no US carrier serves a certain international point when in fact US carrier traffic is first flowing through a connecting city. Figures for U.S. nonstop market share do not necessarily correlate to the total service provided to that point by all U.S. carriers.


The widespread use of code-share agreements also influences this data. Under a code-share agreement, it is common for a passenger to fly on an aircraft owned and operated by a different airline the one from which they bought their ticket. The data in this report represents the air carrier that operated the passenger or cargo flight reported. In some cases, such as U.S. to China, regulatory impediments make it difficult for U.S. domestic carriers to operate adequate service using their own equipment. U.S. carriers compensate by marketing and selling tickets under their own code to those destinations, and then arranging for a foreign code-share partner to actually transport the passengers. Therefore low U.S. market share in certain restricted markets is not indicative of the true proportion of passengers purchasing U.S. carrier tickets, but rather represents the type of carrier that transported the passenger reported. Code-sharing and network- flow data issues also apply to cargo shipments.


These thriving businesses have been in the spotlight during the COVID-19 era. DoorDash (NYSE: DASH) made its public market debut with one of the biggest IPOs of 2020, while Uber (NYSE: UBER) acquired Postmates at the end of November 2020 in an attempt to consolidate market share and boost profitability. Uber is also seeking ways to diversify its existing business, such as by launching a U.S. grocery delivery service and piloting same-day delivery with Costco. Uber has also expanded its prescription delivery partnership with Nimble and acquired alcohol delivery company Drizly. Meanwhile, DoorDash has partnerships with CVS as well as regional and national convenience stores for the delivery of household essentials. DoorDash also partnered with Albertsons to expand its grocery delivery offerings and reportedly engaged in talks to buy Instacart. In September 2021, DoorDash also announced that it was adding alcohol delivery to its app. Both Uber Eats and DoorDash have also recently launched nationwide shipping from select merchants.


In 2014, craft brewers produced 22.2 million barrels, and saw an 18 percent rise in volume2 and a 22 percent increase in retail dollar value3. Retail dollar value was estimated at $19.6 billion representing 19.3 percent market share.


After the giant ecommerce surge brought on by the start of the pandemic, online sales growth slowed significantly for 2021 as many vaccinated and weary consumers returned to stores. Digital spending during the holiday-centric Q4 increased 9.2% year over year, bringing the total jump in ecommerce for 2021 to 14.2%, according to U.S. Department of Commerce figures released Friday.


After a blockbuster 2020, online revenue growth slowed for Amazon.com Inc., No. 1 in the Top 1000. But the web giant still grew its share of the U.S. ecommerce market in 2021. The total value of goods Amazon and its third-party marketplace sellers sold to U.S. consumers, often referred to as gross merchandise value or GMV, increased 18.8% to $378.95 billion last year from $319.10 billion in 2020, Digital Commerce 360 estimates. Meanwhile, online sales in the U.S. grew 14.2%.


In the U.S. market, Hyundai and Kia continue to be the big advancers, furthering gains made in 2021. Even with tight inventory, the Korean brands delivered notable sales and grabbed more market share in 2022. Tesla, too, continued to gain share in the U.S. and now dominates the luxury market, well ahead of traditional luxury leaders BMW, Mercedes and Lexus.


The data collection effort about investor attitudes that I have been conducting since 1989 has now resulted in a group of Stock Market Confidence Indexes produced by the Yale School of Management. These data are collected in collaboration with Fumiko Kon-Ya and Yoshiro Tsutsui of Japan. Some of our earlier results are also noteworthy: Results of Surveys about Stock Market Speculation 12/99. Stock market data used in my book, Irrational Exuberance [Princeton University Press 2000, Broadway Books 2001, 2nd ed., 2005] are available for download, U.S. Stock Markets 1871-Present and CAPE Ratio. This data set consists of monthly stock price, dividends, and earnings data and the consumer price index (to allow conversion to real values), all starting January 1871. The price, dividend, and earnings series are from the same sources as described in Chapter 26 of my earlier book (Market Volatility [Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1989]), although now I use monthly data, rather than annual data. Monthly dividend and earnings data are computed from the S&P four-quarter totals for the quarter since 1926, with linear interpolation to monthly figures. Dividend and earnings data before 1926 are from Cowles and associates (Common Stock Indexes, 2nd ed. [Bloomington, Ind.: Principia Press, 1939]), interpolated from annual data. Stock price data are monthly averages of daily closing prices through January 2000, the last month available as this book goes to press. The CPI-U (Consumer Price Index-All Urban Consumers) published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics begins in 1913; for years before 1913 1 spliced to the CPI Warren and Pearson's price index, by multiplying it by the ratio of the indexes in January 1913. December 1999 and January 2000 values for the CPI-Uare extrapolated. See George F. Warren and Frank A. Pearson, Gold and Prices (New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1935). Data are from their Table 1, pp. 11–14. As of September 2018, I now also include an alternative version of CAPE that is somewhat different. As documented in Bunn & Shiller (2014) and Jivraj and Shiller (2017), changes in corporate payout policy (i. e. share repurchases rather than dividends have now become a dominant approach in the United States for cash distribution to shareholders) may affect the level of the CAPE ratio through changing the growth rate of earnings per share. This subsequently may affect the average of the real earnings per share used in the CAPE ratio. A total return CAPE corrects for this bias through reinvesting dividends into the price index and appropriately scaling the earnings per share. The U.S. Home Price Indices, which Karl Case and I originally developed, which were produced 1991-2002 by our firm Case Shiller Weiss, Inc. under the direction of Allan Weiss, are now produced by CoreLogic under the direction of Linda Ladner and David Stiff. Many of these price indices, including twenty cities, low- medium- and high- tier home price indices, condominium indices, and a U.S. national index, are now published as the S&P/CoreLogic/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices by Standard & Poor's, and are available to the public on Standard & Poor's web site. Eleven of these indices are traded at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Information on these futures markets can be found at Historical housing market data used in my book, Irrational Exuberance [Princeton University Press 2000, Broadway Books 2001, 2nd edition, 2005], showing home prices since 1890 are available for download and updated monthly: US Home Prices 1890-Present. An annual series is also available here, long term stock, bond, interest rate and consumption data since 1871 that I in collaboration with several colleagues collected to examine long term historical trends in the US market. This is Chapter 26 from my book Market Volatility, 1989, and revised and updated. Karl Case and I have collected some data sets on prices of houses, which show for a sample of homes that sold twice between 1970 and 1986 in each of four cities Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, and Oakland, the first sale price, second sale price, first sale date, and second sale date. These data are somewhat outdated, and of interest only to researchers.


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