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Axel Cox
Axel Cox

English Sex Stories Of Mother And Son Pdf


This is a story about incest between a mother and her son. If you don't like that type of story, stop here. The introduction is fairly long but I would encourage you to read it because it sets up the...




English Sex Stories Of Mother And Son Pdf



The Oedipus complex is successfully resolved when the boy begins toidentify with his father as an indirect way to have the mother. Failure to resolve the Oedipus complex mayif(typeof ez_ad_units!='undefined')ez_ad_units.push([[250,250],'simplypsychology_org-medrectangle-3','ezslot_0',615,'0','0']);__ez_fad_position('div-gpt-ad-simplypsychology_org-medrectangle-3-0');


The Oedipus ComplexThe Oedipus complex is a theory of Sigmund Freud, and occurs during the Phallic stage of psychosexual development.It involves a boy, aged between 3 and 6, becoming unconsciously sexually attached to his mother, and hostile towards his father (who he views as a rival).if(typeof ez_ad_units!='undefined')ez_ad_units.push([[300,250],'simplypsychology_org-medrectangle-4','ezslot_5',607,'0','0']);__ez_fad_position('div-gpt-ad-simplypsychology_org-medrectangle-4-0');In the young boy, the Oedipus complex or more correctly, conflict, arises because the boy develops unconscious sexual (pleasurable) desires for his mother.


Envy and Jealous are aimed at the father, the object of the mother's affection and attention. These feelings for the mother and rivalry toward the father lead to fantasies of getting rid of his father and taking his place with the mother.


In patriarchal societies, it may be easier for mothers to pass on their own mother wound to their daughters. Women who have internalized stereotypical beliefs that relegate women to second-class citizens are more likely to consciously or unconsciously transmit these beliefs to their daughters.


Healing from the mother wound is a balance between acknowledging negative feelings such as anger and resentment and recognizing that we may need to forgive our mother. While remaining mired in the negative feelings may make us feel temporarily right, in the long run, we actually lose out.


Our concept of self was built through the way our mother interacted with us. We need to realize that the fact that our mother was unable to build our self-image in a positive way was not our fault. By letting go of the less-than-ideal image, we can recreate our self-image.


I am sure you do not forget our meeting, when, on my way to Jerusalem inpursuance of a vow, in order to sec the relics of the Lord's sojourning in theflesh on the actual spots,1 I ran across you in thecity of Antioch; and you must remember all the different talks we enjoyed, forit was not likely that our meeting would be a silent one, when your wit providedso many subjects for conversation. As often happens at such times, the 18[960B] talk flowed on until we came to discuss the life of some famous person.In this case it was a woman who provided us with our subject; if indeed sheshould be styled woman, for I do not know whether it is fitting to designate herby her sex, who so surpassed her sex. Our account of her was not based on thenarrative of others, but our talk was an accurate description of what we hadlearned by personal experience, nor did it need to be authenticated bystrangers. Nor even was the virgin referred to unknown to our family circle, tomake it necessary to learn the wonders of her life through others, but she camefrom the same parents as ourselves, being, so to speak, an offering offirst-fruits, since she was the earliest born of my mother's womb. As then youhave decided that the story of her noble career is worth telling, to preventsuch a life being unknown to our time, and the record of a woman who raised[960C] herself by "philosophy" 2 to thegreatest 19 height of human virtuepassing into the shades of useless oblivion, I thought it well to obey you, andin a few words, as best I can, to tell her story in unstudied and simple style.


The virgin's name was Macrina; she was so called by her parents after afamous Macrina some time before in the family, our father's mother, who hadconfessed Christ [962A] like a good athlete in the time of the persecutions.This indeed was her name to the outside world, the one used by her friends. Butanother name had been given her privately, as the result of a vision before shewas born into the world. For indeed her mother was so virtuous that she wasguided 20 on all occasions by thedivine will. In particular she loved the pure and unstained mode of life so muchthat she was unwilling to be married. But since she had lost both her parents,and was in the very flower of her youthful beauty, and the fame of her goodlooks was attracting many suitors, and there was a danger that, if she were notmated to some one willingly, she might suffer some [962B] unwished-for violentfate, seeing that some men, inflamed by her beauty, were ready to abduct her----onthis account she chose for her husband a man who was known and approved for thegravity of his conduct, and so gained a protector of her life.


At her first confinement she became the mother of Macrina. When the due timecame for her pangs to be ended by delivery, she fell asleep and seemed to becarrying in her hands that which was still in her womb. And some one in form andraiment more splendid than a human being appeared and 21addressed the child she was carrying by the name of Thecla, that Thecla, I mean,who is so famous among the virgins.3 After doingthis and testifying to it three times, he departed from her sight and gave hereasy delivery, so that at that moment she awoke from sleep and saw her dreamrealised. Now this name was used only in secret. But it [962C] seems to me thatthe apparition spoke not so much to guide the mother to a right choice of name,as to forecast the life of the young child, and to indicate by the name that shewould follow her namesake's mode of life.


Well, the child was reared. Although she had her own nurse, yet as a rule hermother did the nursing with her own hands. After passing the stage of infancy,she showed herself apt in acquiring childish 22accomplishments, and her natural powers were shown in every study to which herparents' judgment directed her. The education of the child was her mother'stask; she did not, however, employ the usual worldly method of education, whichmakes a practice of using poetry as a [962D] means of training the early yearsof the child. For she considered it disgraceful and quite unsuitable, that atender and plastic nature should be taught either those tragic passions ofwomanhood which afforded poets their suggestions and plots, or the indecenciesof comedy, to be, so to speak, denied with unseemly tales of "theharem." 4 But such parts of inspiredScripture as you would think were incomprehensible to young children were thesubject of the girl's studies; in particular the Wisdom of Solomon, and thoseparts of it especially which have an ethical bearing. Nor was she ignorant ofany part of the Psalter, but at stated times she recited every part of it. Whenshe rose from bed, or engaged in household duties, or rested, [964A] or partookof food, or retired from table, when 23she went to bed or rose in the night for prayer, the Psalter was her constantcompanion, like a good fellow-traveller that never deserted her.


With such words repelling those who tried to talk her over, she settled onone safeguard of her good resolution, in a resolve not to be separated from hermother even for a moment 26 of time. Sothat her mother would often say that she had carried the rest of her children inher womb for a definite time, but that Macrina she bore always, since in a senseshe ever carried her about. But the daughter's companionship was not a burden toher mother, nor profitless. For the attentions received from her daughter wereworth those [966A] of many maidservants, and the benefits were mutual. For themother looked after the girl's soul, and the girl looked after her mother'sbody, and in all respects fulfilled the required services, even going so far asto prepare meals for her mother with her own hands. Not that she made this herchief business. But after she had anointed her hands by the performance ofreligious duties---- for she deemed that zeal for this was consistent with theprinciples of her life----in the time that was left she prepared food for hermother by her own toil. And not only this, but she helped her mother to bear herburden of responsibilities. For she had four sons and five daughters, and paidtaxes to three different governors, since her property was 27scattered in as many districts. [966 B] In consequence her mother was distractedwith various anxieties, for her father had by this time departed this life. Inall these matters she shared her mother's toils, dividing her cares with her,and lightening her heavy load of sorrows. At one and the same time, thanks toher mother's guardianship, she was keeping her own life blameless, so that hermother's eye both directed and witnessed all she did; and also by her own lifeshe instructed her mother greatly, leading her to the same mark, that ofphilosophy I mean, and gradually drawing her on to the immaterial and moreperfect life.


When the mother had arranged excellent marriages for the other sisters, suchas was best in each case, Macrina's brother, the great Basil, returned after hislong period of [966C] education, already a practised rhetorician. He was puffedup beyond measure with the pride of oratory and looked down on the 28local dignitaries, excelling in his own estimation all the men of leading andposition. Nevertheless Macrina took him in hand, and with such speed did shedraw him also toward the mark of philosophy that he forsook the glories of thisworld and despised fame gained by speaking, and deserted it for this busy lifewhere one toils with one's hands. His renunciation of property was complete,lest anything should impede the life of virtue. But, indeed, his life and thesubsequent acts, by which he became renowned throughout the world and put intothe shade all those who have won renown for their virtue, would [966D] need along description and much time. But I must divert my tale to its appointed task.


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